Java EE 6 leads to productivity with joy

InfoShare 2011, the free IT and new media conference in Gdansk, is over. I was there for the first time, mostly because of the technological track, including Adam Bien’s “Java EE 6 And Best Practices With Nothing But Code – Live Hacking” and his workshop “Java EE 6 – Productivity With Joy!”. Bottom line conclusion: Java EE 6 leads to productivity with joy and isn’t that all we need?

Adam Bien shows the simplicity of JEE6

Adam Bien is a Java consultant, enterprise architect and developer. He is JCP (Java Community Process) Member and JCP Expert Group Member taking part in Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 6 (Java EE 6) Specification. This was one of the main reasons to be there – to hear about JEE6 from the source. No disappointment at all. Adam presented in just a couple of steps how to start with the JEE6 application. In simple steps he showed how to utilize CDI (Context and Dependency Injection, including CDI Events), EJB3.1 (with scheduling and asynchronous method execution support) and JSF2 by means of just a couple lines of code without any configuration.

It’s easy to give it a try

For developers who want to give JEE6 a try it is a matter of downloading Netbeans 7 with GlashFish 3.1 Server (JEE6 reference implementation) included. Afterwards you start a new project using default web project wizard. In no time the project is ready and you can start coding. No configuration is required and you have all the APIs you need to create enterprise application in place: CDI, JSF2, EJB3.1, JPA2.0, Java Mail, JAXRS, JAXWS and more. That makes developer’s life much easier.

Immediate result of your code changes

While editing your source code, the changes you made will be instantly visible in the running application. That is the advantage of the Netbeans + Glassfish over Eclipse + Tomcat pair I work with. Deployment takes milliseconds what improves the speed of development for sure and saves a lot of time.

At Goyello we develop Java applications mostly by using the Spring Framework. We use JPA2.0, JMS and Java Mail from JEE6 stack as well. In our opinion this combination leads to a similar developer productivity, which means JEE6 is not the only option you have, although it is worth trying.

Do you think you will give JEE6 a try? Do you have any experience with it? Please share your experiences, doubts, questions below.

Development Manager and Java Developer at Goyello. Open source enthusiast, team leader, teacher, blogger and Twitter user @kolorobot